Bad Thoughts

From Shamus Award-winning author Dave Zeltserman comes a dark, captivating thriller unlike any you’ve ever seen, a killer unlike any you’ve ever imagined, and an ending unlike any you’ve ever dreamed of that will leave you cheering.

One afternoon 13 year-old Billy Shannon comes home to a living nightmare. His mother being brutally murdered is only the beginning…

20 years later, Bill Shannon is now a cop in Cambridge, Massachusetts. As the twenty-year anniversary of his mother’s death is approaching, women are being murdered in the same horrific grisly fashion.

Everything seems to be pointing to one of two possibilities: Shannon has gone insane or his mom’s killer is back to his old tricks. Except if it’s mom’s killer, he’s come back a long way to do these new killings… all the way from the grave.

Reviews for Bad Thoughts

“Dark, brutal, captivating — this is one hell of a book, the kind of book that doesn’t let go of you once you start it. Dave Zeltserman is clearly the real deal.”

Steve Hamilton

“Dave Zeltserman’s Bad Thoughts is a fast moving occult thriller, with taut dialogue and smart, likeable characters. Darkness pervades the Bay State in the late 1990’s and Detective Bill Shannon will be lucky to solve a standard missing person’s case in one piece. In fact as the story unfolds we see that death and dismemberment could be the least of Bill’s worries. Pour yourself a fifth of Scotch, get an easy chair, grab a protective talisman and enjoy.”

Adrian McKinty

“I’m not sure I ever truly understood the concept of ‘evil’ before reading Bad Thoughts. In chilling prose and dialogue, Dave Zeltserman paints a portrait of a serial killer who surpasses Hannibal Lecter in ‘creativity’ and substitutes astral guile for intellect: a villain who not only toys with his victims’ minds but also can enter both his victims’ and the hero’s dreams. Stunning, though definitely not for the faint of heart.”

Jeremiah Healy

“…And it’s at this point that the genre gets bent. After that, it’s a wild ride. I was reminded a little of Blood Dreams, a novel by the late Jack MacLane, published by Zebra just after the era of the knives-in-fresh-fruit covers. Joe Lansdale’s Act of Love had one of those covers, come to think of it. Zeltserman’s book would rest comfortably on the shelf beside them. If you’re looking for a hardboiled anybody-can-die-at-any-time book that’s a change of pace from the usual, look no further.”

Bill Crider